Nov 052020
 
Title: Drawing of the day, Thomas Alva Edison | Artist: Pieter Zandvliet | Category: Drawing of the day

Thomas Alva Edison (February 11, 1847 – October 18, 1931) was an American inventor and businessman who has been described as America’s greatest inventor.[1][2][3] He developed many devices in fields such as electric power generationmass communicationsound recording, and motion pictures.[4] These inventions, which include the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and early versions of the electric light bulb, have had a widespread impact on the modern industrialized world.[5] He was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of organized science and teamwork to the process of invention, working with many researchers and employees. He established the first industrial research laboratory.[6]

Edison was raised in the American Midwest; early in his career he worked as a telegraph operator, which inspired some of his earliest inventions.[4] In 1876, he established his first laboratory facility in Menlo Park, New Jersey, where many of his early inventions were developed. He later established a botanic laboratory in Fort Myers, Florida in collaboration with businessmen Henry Ford and Harvey S. Firestone, and a laboratory in West Orange, New Jersey that featured the world’s first film studio, the Black Maria. He was a prolific inventor, holding 1,093 US patents in his name, as well as patents in other countries. Edison married twice and fathered six children. He died in 1931 of complications of diabetes.

 November 5, 2020  Posted by at 23:20 Drawing of the day No Responses »
Nov 042020
 
Title: Drawing of the day, J. Robert Oppenheimer | Artist: Pieter Zandvliet | Category: Drawing of the day

Julius Robert Oppenheimer[note 1] (/ˈɒpənˌhaɪmər/; April 22, 1904 – February 18, 1967) was an American theoretical physicist and professor of physics at the University of California, Berkeley. Oppenheimer was the wartime head of the Los Alamos Laboratory and is among those who are credited with being the “father of the atomic bomb” for their role in the Manhattan Project, the World War II undertaking that developed the first nuclear weapons. The first atomic bomb was successfully detonated on July 16, 1945, in the Trinity test in New Mexico. Oppenheimer later remarked that it brought to mind words from the Bhagavad Gita: “Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds.”[2][note 2] In August 1945, the weapons were used in the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

After the war ended, Oppenheimer became chairman of the influential General Advisory Committee of the newly created United States Atomic Energy Commission. He used that position to lobby for international control of nuclear power to avert nuclear proliferation and a nuclear arms race with the Soviet Union. He opposed the development of the hydrogen bomb during a 1949–50 governmental debate on the question and subsequently took stances on defense-related issues that provoked the ire of some factions in the U.S. government and military. During the Second Red Scare, those stances, together with past associations Oppenheimer had had with people and organizations affiliated with the Communist Party, led to him suffering the revocation of his security clearance in a much-written-about hearing in 1954. Effectively stripped of his direct political influence, he continued to lecture, write and work in physics. Nine years later, President John F. Kennedy awarded (and Lyndon B. Johnson presented) him with the Enrico Fermi Award as a gesture of political rehabilitation.

Oppenheimer’s achievements in physics included the Born–Oppenheimer approximation for molecular wave functions, work on the theory of electrons and positrons, the Oppenheimer–Phillips process in nuclear fusion, and the first prediction of quantum tunneling. With his students he also made important contributions to the modern theory of neutron stars and black holes, as well as to quantum mechanicsquantum field theory, and the interactions of cosmic rays. As a teacher and promoter of science, he is remembered as a founding father of the American school of theoretical physics that gained world prominence in the 1930s. After World War II, he became director of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey.

 November 4, 2020  Posted by at 22:39 Drawing of the day No Responses »
Nov 042020
 
Title: Drawing of the day, Judas | Artist: Pieter Zandvliet | Category: Drawing of the day

Judas Iscariot (/ˈdʒuːdəs ɪˈskærɪət/Biblical Hebrew: יהודה איש-קריות‎‎, romanized: Yehûdâh Ish-KerayotAramaic: ܝܗܘܕܐ ܣܟܪܝܘܛܐ; Greek: Ὶούδας Ὶσκαριώτης; died c. 30 – c. 33 AD) was a disciple and one of the original Twelve Apostles of Jesus Christ. According to all four canonical gospels, Judas betrayed Jesus to the Sanhedrin in the Garden of Gethsemane by kissing him and addressing him as “rabbi” to reveal his identity to the crowd who had come to arrest him.[1] His name is often used synonymously with betrayal or treason. Judas’s epithet Iscariot most likely means he came from the village of Kerioth, but this explanation is not universally accepted and many other possibilities have been suggested.

The Gospel of Mark, the earliest gospel, gives no motive for Judas’s betrayal, but does present Jesus predicting it at the Last Supper, an event also described in all the later gospels. The Gospel of Matthew 26:15 states that Judas committed the betrayal in exchange for thirty pieces of silver. The Gospel of Luke 22:3 and the Gospel of John 13:27 suggest that he was possessed by Satan. According to Matthew 27:1–10, after learning that Jesus was to be crucified, Judas attempted to return the money he had been paid for his betrayal to the chief priests and committed suicide by hanging. The priests used the money to buy a field to bury strangers in, which was called the “Field of Blood” because it had been bought with blood money. The Book of Acts 1:18 quotes Peter as saying that Judas used the money to buy the field himself and, he “[fell] headlong… burst asunder in the midst, and all his bowels gushed out.” His place among the Twelve Apostles was later filled by Matthias.

Due to his notorious role in all the gospel narratives, Judas remains a controversial figure in Christian history. For instance, Judas’s betrayal is seen as setting in motion the events that led to Jesus’s crucifixion and resurrection, which, according to traditional Christian theology, brought salvation to humanity. The Gnostic Gospel of Judas—rejected by the proto-orthodox Church as heretical—portrays Judas’s actions as done in obedience to instructions given to him by Jesus, and that he alone amongst the disciples knew Jesus’s true teachings. Since the Middle Ages, Judas has sometimes been portrayed as a personification of the Jewish people and his betrayal has been used to justify Christian antisemitism.

 November 4, 2020  Posted by at 22:37 Drawing of the day No Responses »
Nov 022020
 
Title: Drawing of the day, Mattheüs of Bartholomeüs | Artist: Pieter Zandvliet | Category: Drawing of the day

Matthias (Koine Greek: Μαθθίας, MaththíasGreek pronunciation: [maθˈθi.as], from Hebrew מַתִּתְיָהוּ‎ Mattiṯyā́hūCoptic: ⲙⲁⲑⲓⲁⲥ; died c. AD 80) was, according to the Acts of the Apostles (written c. AD 80–90), chosen by the apostles to replace Judas Iscariot following the latter’s betrayal of Jesus and his subsequent death.[1] His calling as an apostle is unique, in that his appointment was not made personally by Jesus, who had already ascended into heaven, and it was also made before the descent of the Holy Spirit upon the early Church.

 November 2, 2020  Posted by at 20:12 Drawing of the day No Responses »
Nov 012020
 
Title: Drawing of the day, Johnny Torrio | Artist: Pieter Zandvliet | Category: Drawing of the day

John Donato Torrio[1] (born Donato TorrioItalian: [doˈnaːto ˈtɔrrjo]; January 20, 1882 – April 16, 1957) was an Italian-American mobster who helped build the Chicago Outfit in the 1920s. It was later inherited by his protégé Al Capone.[2] Torrio proposed a National Crime Syndicate in the 1930s and later became an adviser to Lucky Luciano and his Luciano crime family.

Torrio had several nicknames, primarily “The Fox” for his cunning and finesse.[3] Considered one of the most influential personalities in American organized crime, Torrio impressed authorities and chroniclers with his business acumen and diplomatic skills.

The US Treasury official Elmer Irey considered him “the biggest gangster in America” and wrote, “He was the smartest and, I dare say, the best of all the hoodlums. ‘Best’ referring to talent, not morals”.[4] Virgil W. Peterson of the Chicago Crime Commission stated that his “talents as an organizational genius were widely respected by the major gang bosses in the New York City area”.[5] Crime journalist Herbert Asbury affirmed: “As an organizer and administrator of underworld affairs Johnny Torrio is unsurpassed in the annals of American crime; he was probably the nearest thing to a real mastermind that this country has yet produced”

 November 1, 2020  Posted by at 18:57 Drawing of the day No Responses »